African Bull Frog Care

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African bull frogs get quiet large, they are the second largest frog species in the world, fully grown they can be anywhere from 6 inches for females and 10 inches for males. Large males can weigh over 2 pounds! To house these frogs you want a 10 gallon cage for juveniles under 5 inches and a 20 gallon or larger for adults. A glass enclosure works really well with a secure screen top.


For the substrate of the enclosure coco fiber is a good choice, it's great at holding humidity. Alternatively peat moss works well. Just be sure any substrate you use is free of insecticides, pesticides, harmful chemicals, and insects/parasites. Whatever bedding you use you want to be very clean, most organic soils will work.


Keep the temperature in the cage between 77-85 degrees. You can have a drop to the low 70s at night. Offering a temperature gradient by making one side of the tank warmer and one side cooler is a good idea. 


In the wild these frogs will sit in shallow water in the mud. You want to provide them with high humidity by keeping their substrate wet as well as a bowl of water or an area of shallow water for them to soak in. Be sure to change the water and bedding often to prevent any mold or bacteria growth. 


African bull frogs are voracious eaters, they are pretty much always willing to eat and will eat anything from crickets to large rats! There are many options to feed your frog like crickets, night crawlers, roaches, mealworms, mice, rats, locust, pretty much any common feeder insects. Feed your frog every other day when they are babies and when fully grown you want to offer food every three days. You can also dust the food with a calcium and vitamin powder as needed.(follow the instructions on the container of the supplements you use.)


You want to try to avoid handling your frog. Like most amphibians it is best to limit handling to whenever necessary, such as cleaning the cage. They can inflict a powerful bite so use caution and always pick them up from behind their front legs, fully supporting their large weight.